Horseradish. The Original Commercial Condiment

Horseradish has been used as a condiment in food for centuries. European immigrants first brought roots to the United States as part of their gardening arsenal. They also brought dandelions. Both are good for you and both are VERY INVASIVE. Repeat…VERY INVASIVE.

If you make room for horseradish in your garden you will have it forever, no matter how many roots you harvest. The tiniest sliver of root that gets left behind (and some will ALWAYS get left behind) will grow into a robust plant. For horseradish lovers this is good news, but do keep it in mind when choosing a place in your garden.

If you don’t want to grow it or go through the eye watering process of harvesting and preparing it for culinary use, you can always buy it thanks to John Henry Heinz.

Fun fact. Horseradish was the first condiment to be marketed commercially. John Henry Heinz (of Heinz ketchup fame) bottled his mother’s horseradish sauce recipe way back in 1869 and began to market it. Other condiments soon followed, and the rest, as they say, is horseradish. I mean history.