Three Great Uses for Chamomile Tea

One – If you’re starting some–or all– of this season’s plants from seeds don’t forget to water your seedlings with chamomile tea. Cool chamomile tea of course! Doing so about every third watering will help prevent the dastardly dreaded damp off; a disease that causes your baby seedlings to topple over and expire.

A bunch of baby plants growing inside of pots inside of a greenhouse nursery.

Other tips for preventing damp off include using sterilized potting soil and allowing your seedlings to dry out a little between watering times. A little known fact is that roots need to breathe too. You don’t want the soil to dry out so much your seedlings start to wilt, but if the soil is continuously soggy for days on end or if your pots are always sitting in a saucer of water, the roots never get a chance to take in any air along with their H2O. When you stick your finger into the soil it should feel moist…sort of like a baked cake.

Two – For those of you with light coloured hair, heavily steeped chamomile tea makes a wonderful all natural hair rinse that will help cover grey roots and/or add highlights and shine. The results are temporary and will eventually wash out.

Three – And last, but certainly not least, chamomile tea makes a very soothing nightcap. A cup before bed is known for its calming properties to help ensure a good nights sleep.

chamomile tea

If you would like to grow chamomile in your herb garden for making your own tea, choose German Chamomile Matricaria recutita. Harvest the blossoms early in the morning to ensure the highest medicinal content. Waiting for the dew to dissipate will help speed the drying process. Dry the blossoms by spreading them apart on a screen where they will get lots of air circulation or by using a food dehydrator. Store in an airtight container in a cool, dark place.